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 AUGUST 21st, 2014
DIE SO FLUID EXCLUSIVE


Die So Fluid are an English hard rock band that formed in London, England in 2000. The group consists of 3 members, songwriter Grog (vocals, bass), Drew Richards (guitar), and Al Fletcher (drums, backing vocals). We are here with Drew and Grog. Thank you for taking the time to do this interview with us.

1: For fans who are new to your band what is behind the name 'Die So Fluid'? How did the band form?


We were already drinking buddies and then one night, whilst drinking, Al came up with that name. At the time he explained it to mean “leave something beautiful after you're gone”. We were just happy it was poetic enough to be original. Our previous idea for a name was used by about 14 other bands.

2: Can you tell us the concept behind your latest video BLACK BLIZZARD? What was the creative process in making the video?

We handed a lot of the creative process over to the director, David Kenny, and his team. We gave him the outline of what the song was about, man’s underestimation and misunderstanding of the natural world, and he came back with a treatment. A lot of what you do with videos is what is economically viable so I think we were lucky to arrive at a really sumptuous looking video that tells the story in a dramatic way.

3: Your new album Opposites of Light, which was released on May 5th of 2014 is your 4th studio album. Tracks 1-8 are grouped under the name 'Shakura’ and tracks 9-16 are ‘Pah’. Can you explain the concept?  


We had a whole different sound emerge when we were writing the album, all these kind of vampiric ballads, but we didn’t want to totally leave behind our sound from the previous album. So Shakura represents a more ‘DSF rockin’ as usual’ side and then Pah is the darker moon cycle side. I would suggest listening to Shakura as you’re getting ready to go out and Pah when you come home. Aural uppers and downers basically.

4: What were the challenges in making the new album compared to your last album The World Is Too Big For One Lifetime?  

The Atlantic mostly. We had to figure out how to write via internet and also record a lot of it that way. We did alright in the end but it was a steep learning curve. We also self produced this record and self released so you know it was almost like working for a living. I didn’t get into music to do work!

5: When an album is being created what comes first, the riffs, drum blasts, lyrics. What are the stages in creating your albums?

Well never drum blasts although maybe we should try that next - new approach. We used to almost always write riff-melody-lyrics-arrangement. Some was done like that but again, because of the distance a lot was written in a much more conventional songwriting way, with one person coming up with a complete song, and then sending the demo to the others for them to write their own parts.

6: The artwork for ‘The Opposites Of Light is a photo of you walking on the beach. What is it depicting?


Well the image is obviously derived from the ‘Black Blizzard’ video but it pertains to the title as the sea is another powerful force that at it’s depths banishes all light. Even in 2014 there’s a lot that is still mysterious in the world - thankfully. I mean scientists have their place but do you ever find them annoying when they explain away and label everything and say there’s no Loch Ness monster or UFOs or Bigfoot. Scientists are a bunch of buzzkills frankly.

7: Do you guys write new song material on the road or do you find being on the road you just want to focus on your live performances? How do you navigate songwriting with one another?


I don’t think we’ve ever written on the road and I can't imagine any band having the time to do that anymore. A touring band is expected to constantly be updating social media so everyone knows everything about you at all time. I’ll be in Berlin just finishing my yoghurt and people will be tweeting “what did you have for breakfast?? I need to know!!” #exhausting.

8: How important is playing live to you these days?

That is the main reason I became a musician - to entertain people and get direct feedback from people who are enjoying your music. Recording just seems like a vanity project now. Who buys records anymore? I suppose recorded music is still useful for selling stuff on adverts.

9: The majority of bands in metal have 4 or 5 members but very few have three. Why only three members in the band?

When we started the band we drove ourselves to gigs in a ford transit van. It only had three seats. That really is the reason.

10: What musical roots did you grow up with? What were your influences that made you what you are today?

We grew up listening to Led Zep, Hawkwind, Midnight Oil, The Police, Peter Tosh, Shirley Bassey, Iron Maiden and Prince. Make of that what you will sir but from these varied ingredients was boiled a hearty stew of rock.

11: Are there any plans to tour North America in 2014 or 2015?

We have a North American agent and she is looking into something suitable. We need to get Drew and Al a work visa but that’s probably just a question of bribing someone at the U.S. Embassy. Oh capitalism!

12: When you are not working on band things, what do you enjoy doing the most?

Cruising around on my bitchin’ ride looking for a rumble. I recently got a motorcycle and am now looking for a sidecar so I can take my dog on road adventures.

13: Anything you want to say to fans reading this interview?

Thank you for your gracious attention and I appreciate you for not spitting throughout the process.